inappropri8:

dear hipsters,

inappropri8:

dear hipsters,

(via indigenous-thoughts)

La poesía existe en todas las cosas, en lo feo, en lo hermoso, en lo repugnante; lo difícil es saberla descubrir, despertar los lagos profundos del alma. Federico García Lorca (via avenidadelospoetas)

(Source: unpoemaparasilbarlo, via desdeaquihastalaluna)

1,125 notes
By being yourself, you put something wonderful in the world that was not there before. Edwin Elliot (via stay-ocean-minded)

(Source: seabois, via desdeaquihastalaluna)

3,481 notes

queenfattyoftherollpalace:

If children of color have to be aware of the realities of racism, white children should too.

I’m tired of hearing that white children are too young to understand the consequence of their words or actions when for nonwhite kids they live with the impact of racism every day 

(via mexicatiahui)

31,263 notes

Mexico City. 

Mexico City. 

(Source: stoptellingwomentosmile, via desdeaquihastalaluna)

phoenix-falls:

queereyes-queerminds:

lostruth:

Power Structure of Oppression

Yes. Yes. YES. 

I’m just gonna leave this here, in case anyone thought their fee fees were more important than systematic oppression 

phoenix-falls:

queereyes-queerminds:

lostruth:

Power Structure of Oppression

Yes. Yes. YES. 

I’m just gonna leave this here, in case anyone thought their fee fees were more important than systematic oppression 

(Source: coraxon, via mexicatiahui)

winefinedarkchicks:

I’m Not Watching All-White Movies Anymore
When you do the math it just doesn’t add up.  A movie costs about $13.75. Plus parking and snacks.  On average, I’m spending about $25 every time I go see a movie.  I usually see a movie at least 4 times a month.  That’s $100 a month.  Multiply that by 12 months and I’m spending $1200 a year on movies alone.  That’s rent money.
I’m wasting rent money on these films that purposefully exclude me.  Why would I do that?  That’s completely insane.  
If I took that $1200 every year and put it in my savings account I could invest in my own original content.  I wish I’d thought of doing this years ago.  I’d probably be directing a feature film by now.  But as they say, there’s no time like the present. 
Read more at winefinedarkchicks.com

winefinedarkchicks:

I’m Not Watching All-White Movies Anymore

When you do the math it just doesn’t add up.  A movie costs about $13.75. Plus parking and snacks.  On average, I’m spending about $25 every time I go see a movie.  I usually see a movie at least 4 times a month.  That’s $100 a month.  Multiply that by 12 months and I’m spending $1200 a year on movies alone.  That’s rent money.

I’m wasting rent money on these films that purposefully exclude me.  Why would I do that?  That’s completely insane.  

If I took that $1200 every year and put it in my savings account I could invest in my own original content.  I wish I’d thought of doing this years ago.  I’d probably be directing a feature film by now.  But as they say, there’s no time like the present.

Read more at winefinedarkchicks.com

(via poc-creators)

You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read. James Baldwin (via noor3amoor)

(Source: books-foreverandalways, via desdeaquihastalaluna)

4,823 notes

by (Russell Ord)
eastlafatboy:

Mexican-American

eastlafatboy:

Mexican-American

(via mexicatiahui)

Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.

Ray Salazar, Mexican etiquette some white people need to learn on dad’s 77th birthday. (via chulaquiles)

(Source: frijoliz, via isatresleches)

25,216 notes